The Shaman of the Spirit Mountain. Red sandstone
cave. Mohave desert. Nevada
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Alex Volborth — Awakening spirits that were there all along

Alex Volborth’s interest in art history, world cultures and spiritualism play a major role
in his particular brand of found art photography, which seamlessly blends decaying
objects with geological formations. To call his work simply ‘found art’ doesn’t
suffice—'found artifacts' or 'undiscovered art' would describe it better, as his photos
may include anything from a rock formation bearing a resemblance to the Edvard
Munch painting, “The Scream,” to a small skeleton of an unknown animal perfectly
silhouetted in red sandstone. But whether it's a rusty piece of a broken bicycle or an
old Sicilian ash tray, Volborth shows us more than that with his uncanny ability to
recognize the art in the mundane, and create the sense that he is uncovering a secret
by revealing for the first time what has been there all along.


Alex, a beloved husband and father, passed away last year, but his spirit lives on in the
hearts that he touched in his long rich life, and in his beautiful photographs. Although
his accomplishments in his chosen field of geology would be known throughout the
world, his love of art was his passion from the time he was in short pants. He attended
every gallery and museum he had ever heard of and the works of the great artists of all
time were etched into his retinas. While pursuing his love of photography, the
geological formations that were his muses suddenly and magically started to reveal art
in the most purest form. From there, obsessed with the astounding initial results, he
spent his golden years in search of the great works of nature.
Alex Volborth — Awakening spirits that were there all along

Alex Volborth’s interest in art history, world cultures and spiritualism play a major role
in his particular brand of found art photography, which seamlessly blends decaying
objects with geological formations. To call his work simply ‘found art’ doesn’t
suffice—'found artifacts' or 'undiscovered art' would describe it better, as his photos
may include anything from a rock formation bearing a resemblance to the Edvard
Munch painting, “The Scream,” to a small skeleton of an unknown animal perfectly
silhouetted in red sandstone. But whether it's a rusty piece of a broken bicycle or an
old Sicilian ash tray, Volborth shows us more than that with his uncanny ability to
recognize the art in the mundane, and create the sense that he is uncovering a secret
by revealing for the first time what has been there all along.


Alex, a beloved husband and father, passed away last year, but his spirit lives on in the
hearts that he touched in his long rich life, and in his beautiful photographs. Although
his accomplishments in his chosen field of geology would be known throughout the
world, his love of art was his passion from the time he was in short pants. He attended
every gallery and museum he had ever heard of and the works of the great artists of all
time were etched into his retinas. While pursuing his love of photography, the
geological formations that were his muses suddenly and magically started to reveal art
in the most purest form. From there, obsessed with the astounding initial results, he
spent his golden years in search of the great works of nature.